Aloe | Ash | Daisy | Flax | Garlic | Grass | Hawthorne | Lavender | Lemon |
Moss | Nettle | Oak | Olive | Palm | Rose | Rosemary

Shakespeare Garden Plants
San Jose, California

These are plants mentioned by Shakespeare that grow in my garden. Photos of additional plants will be added as the seasons progress. Contact Katy Dickinson with questions at katy.dickinson at gmail dot com.

Additional photos can be found here.


Aloe
"Love's arms are peace, 'gainst rule, 'gainst sense, 'gainst shame,
And sweetens, in the suff'ring pangs it bears,
The aloes of all forces, shocks, and fears."
A Lover's Complaint lines 271-273
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Ash Tree
"...Let me twine
Mine arms about that body, where against
My grained ash an hundred times hath broke,
And scarr'd the moon with splinters...."
Coriolanus IV, v, 106-109
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Daisy
"When daisies pied and violets blue
And lady-smocks all silver-white
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
Do paint the meadows with delight,
The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men..."
Love's Labors Lost V, II, 894-899
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Flax
"Go thou. I'll fetch some flax and whites of eggs
To apply to his bleeding face. Now heaven help him!"
King Lear III, vii, 106-107
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Garlic
"And, most dear actors, eat no onions
nor garlic, for we are to utter sweet breath; and I
do not doubt but to hear them say, it is a sweet
comedy. No more words: away! go, away!"
Midsummer Night's Dream IV ii 43
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Grass & Rosemary
"There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray,
love, remember: and there is pansies. that's for thoughts.
...
here's fennel for you, and columbines: there's rue
for you; and here's some for me: we may call it
herb-grace o' Sundays: O you must wear your rue with
a difference. There's a daisy: I would give you
some violets, but they withered all when my father
died..."
Hamlet IV v 174


"The strawberry grows underneath the nettle
And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
Neighbour'd by fruit of baser quality:
And so the prince obscured his contemplation
Under the veil of wildness; which, no doubt,
Grew like the summer grass, fastest by night,
Unseen, yet crescive in his faculty."
Henry V I i 65
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Lavender
"Here's flowers for you;
Hot lavender, mints, savoury, marjoram;
The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun
And with him rises weeping: these are flowers
Of middle summer, and I think they are given
To men of middle age. You're very welcome."
Winter's Tale IV, iv, 104-108
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Lavender & Hawthorne
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Lemon
"The armipotent Mars, of lances the almighty, Gave Hector a gift,--

A gilt nutmeg.

A lemon.

Stuck with cloves.

No, cloven."
Love's Labors Lost V, II, 647-649
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Moss
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Nettle
"There is a willow grows aslant a brook,
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream;
There with fantastic garlands did she come
Of crow-flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples
That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
But our cold maids do dead men's fingers call them:
There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook."
Hamlet IV, vii, 166-175
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Oak Tree
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Olive
"The time of universal peace is near:
Prove this a prosperous day, the three-nook'd world
Shall bear the olive freely."
Antony and Cleopatra IV vi 5-7
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Palm
"I was seven of the nine days out of the wonder
before you came; for look here what I found on a
palm-tree. I was never so be-rhymed since
Pythagoras' time, that I was an Irish rat, which I
can hardly remember."
As You Like It III ii 174-178
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Rose
"Let him that is no coward nor no flatterer,
But dare maintain the party of the truth,
Pluck a red rose from off this thorn with me.

I love no colours, and without all colour
Of base insinuating flattery
I pluck this white rose with Plantagenet.

I pluck this red rose with young Somerset
And say withal I think he held the right.

Stay, lords and gentlemen, and pluck no more,
Till you conclude that he upon whose side
The fewest roses are cropp'd from the tree
Shall yield the other in the right opinion."
Henry VI i, II iv 31-42
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Updated 30 October 2003 (rehosted on March 5, 2006)

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For comments/questions about the contents of this page, contact katy.dickinson at gmail dot com

Photographs by John Plocher

Copyright © Katy Dickinson 2003